Turkish parliament opens for 25th term
Newly-elected Members of Parliament will vote in a secret ballot on June 30 to elect their new parliament speaker

The Turkish parliament has convened for the first plenary session of its 25th term after a two-month break that included the June 7 general election.

The Republican People's Party's (CHP) freshly-elected Deniz Baykal presided over the assembly as the acting speaker Tuesday. In accordance with the law, Baykal was given the honor to preside since he, at 76, was the senior most Member of Parliament. He will hold that position until a new speaker is elected.

In his speech at the opening ceremony, Baykal said that the parliamentarians were now representatives of all people, not just for those who voted them.

"After a long, bittersweet single-party ruling period, our people have decided for us to cooperate, to govern by joining forces," he said.

The Supreme Elections Committee announced the official results of Turkey’s 25th parliamentary elections on Thursday.

According to the official results, the Justice and Development (AK) Party is the leading party with 258 deputies elected to the Turkish parliament. The Republican People's Party (CHP) has 132 seats, while the Nationalist Movement Party (MHP) and pro-Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party (HDP) each have 80 seats.

Candidates for the seat of parliament speaker will submit their applications after the oath-taking ceremony. The deadline for applications will be June 28 at 12.00 a.m., local time (1000GMT).

According to the Turkish constitution, the election of the speaker shall be conducted via secret ballot. The first two ballots, which will take place on June 30, require a two-thirds majority of the total members. In the third, to be held on July 1, the absolute majority is needed.

If this cannot be obtained, a fourth ballot shall be held on the same day in a run-off between the two candidates who have received the highest number of votes in the third ballot.

Since none of the four parties has the necessary majority to form a single-party government, they are expected to negotiate some form of coalition following the opening of parliament.

Turkey's constitution stipulates that a new government must be formed within 45 days following the president officially asking a party.

If no government is formed, the country will have to hold snap elections.

AA
Last Modified: 2015-06-24 09:27:26
  • Visitors: 10698
  • (Suanki Oy 0.0/5 Yildiz) Toplam Oy: 0
  • 0 0